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The Cleft Registry and Audit NEtwork

Publications
 
Annual & Progress Reports 

 


If copies of earlier reports are required, please contact crane@rcseng.ac.uk
 

Peer Reviewed Papers 

Early academic achievement in children with isolated clefts: a population-based study in England (Published January 2018)

The study used national data to examine differences in academic achievement between 5-year-old children with an isolated oral cleft and the general population. We also assessed differences in achievement by cleft type. The study analysed data linked between CRANE, Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and the National Pupil Database (NPD). 2,802 children with a cleft and no additional anomalies were included. We found that, compared with the national average, 5-year-old children with an isolated oral cleft, especially those involving the palate, have significantly poorer academic achievement across all areas of learning. Our findings indicate that children with a cleft may benefit from extra academic support with starting school.

Full reference and link: K J Fitzsimons, L P Copley, Efrosini Setakis, Susan C Charman, S A Deacon, Lorraine Dearden, J H van der Meulen. Early academic achievement in children with isolated clefts: a population-based study in England. Archives of Disease in Childhood. 2018;103:356-362.


Grommets Surgery in Children with Orofacial Clefts in England (Published January 2017)

This study examined grommet insertion practice in the first five years of life among children with a cleft in England. We used data from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) to examine the proportion of children receiving grommets before the age of five, the timing of the first grommet insertion, and the proportion of children having repeat grommet insertions according to cleft type, the absence or presence of additional anomalies, socio-economic deprivation, and region of residence. Of the 8,269 children with a cleft included in the study, 36.5% received grommets before the age of five years. Of these, one third received their grommets at the time of their primary cleft repair and one third received multiple grommet insertion procedures. Children with a cleft affecting the palate were more likely to receive grommets than children with a cleft lip alone (45.5% vs. 4.5%). Grommet insertion practice also varied according to year of birth, absence or presence of additional anomalies, socioeconomic deprivation and region of residence.

Full reference and link: K J Fitzsimons, L P Copley, J H van der Meulen, C Panagamuwa, S A Deacon. Grommet Surgery in Children with Orofacial Clefts in England. The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2017;54(1):80-89.


Hospital admissions for dental treatment among children with cleft lip and/or palate born between 1997 and 2003: an analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics in England (Published May 2014)

This study examined hospital admissions for surgical removal of teeth, simple extraction of teeth, and restoration of teeth before the age of seven years among children with a cleft. The study included 6,551 children and analysed data from Hospital Episode Statistics. We identified 858 hospital admissions for dental treatment. 66.4% of admissions were primarily for caries and 95.6% involved extractions. 11.4% of children with a cleft had at least one admision for dental treatment. The presence of additional anomalies, having a more severe cleft type, and living in relatively deprived areas increased the risk of hospital admission.

Full reference and link: K J Fitzsimons, L P Copley, J A Smallridge, V J Clark, J H van der Meulen, S A Deacon. Hospital admissions for dental treatment among children with cleft lip and/or palate born between 1997 and 2003: an analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics in England. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry. 2014;24(3):200-208.


Hospital care of children with a cleft in England (Published May 2014)

Using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, this study examined hospital admissions in the first two years of life among children with a cleft lip and/or palate in England.  10,892 children with a cleft were included. In the first two years, children without additional anomalies (8,482) had on average 3.2 admissions and 13.2 days in hospital, while children with additional anomalies (2,410) had on average 6.7 admissions and 51.4 days in hospital. The burden of hospital care also varied according to cleft type, with cleft lip associated with the fewest admissions and days in hospital, and bilateral cleft lip and palate associated with the highest number of admissions and days in hospital. Cleft-specific hospital care did not differ between children with and without additional anomalies.

Full reference and link: K J Fitzsimons, L P Copley, S A Deacon, J H van der Meulen. Hospital care of children with a cleft in England. Archives of Disease in Childhood. 2013;98:970-974.


Centralisation of services for children with cleft lip or palate in England: a study of hospital episode statistics (Published 2012)

In 1998, a process of centralisation was initiated for services for children born with a cleft lip or palate in the UK. Using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, we studies the timing of this process in England according to its impact on the number of hospitals and surgeons involved in primary surgical cleft repairs. A total of 8,606 children with a non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate, born between April 1997 and December 2008, were identified. The number of hospitals carrying out primary cleft repairs on non-syndromic children reduced from 49 in 1997 to 13, with 11 of these performing repairs on at least 40 children born in 2008. The number of surgeons responsible for repairs reduced from 98 to 26, with 22 each performing repairs on at least 20 children born in 2008. Average length of hospital stay reduced during the same time period. We found that the speed of centralisation varied across regions. 

Full reference and link: K J Fitzsimons, S Mukarram, L P Copley, S A Deacon, J H van der Meulen. Centralisation of services for children with cleft lip or palate in England: a study of hospital episode statistics. BMC Health Services Research. 2012;12:970-974.
 

Consultation & Summary Reports 
 
Consultation on the CRANE Database and Website Changes - June 2015 Key Points (01 July 2015)

Representatives from across the regional cleft centres and specialties, and patient and parent/carer representatives, attended our consultation meeting on the 9th of June 2015. Their valuable input is summarised in the following document providing a summary of the key points and suggestions.

We encourage you to contact us by phone or email crane@rcseng.ac.uk to continue sharing your and your peers' thoughts and ideas on this topic.

 
 

CRANE eNewsletters 


CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2018 (1) 12 January 2018

CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (3) 11 September 2017

CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (2) 1 June 2017

CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (1) 22 February 2017


If copies of earlier eNewsletters are needed, please contact crane@rcseng.ac.uk
 

CRANE Database Annual Report November 2015 v1.1
PDF
CRANE Database Meeting 2015_Key Points
PDF
CRANE Annual Report 2016 v1
PDF
CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (1) 22 February 2017 v1
PDF
CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (2) 1 June 2017 v1
PDF
CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2017 (3) 11 September 2017
PDF
CRANE eNewsletter - Issue 2018 (1) 12 January 2018 v1.1
PDF
CRANE Annual Report 2017 v1.1
PDF
CRANE Annual Report 2014
PDF
CRANE Annual Report 2013 (Final)
PDF
CRANE Annual Report December 2012
PDF